Monthly Archives: January 2015

Great Market News

Hey, remember how you pretty much never submit to F&SF because they only take postal submissions?  That excuse isn’t relevant anymore.

Some of you probably remember that C. C. Finlay did a couple of spots guest-editing the magazine in the past year during which time he was taking electronic submissions (I might add that he sent me a fantastic rejection during his last reading period).  Well, it was just announced that Finlay has been named Editor of F&SF, so e-subs will stay open.

Fantastic.


At the Mountains of Madness

Some time ago, I posted, somewhat cryptically, that I was working on a thing.

Well, I’m proud to announce that, finally, that thing is done.

What started as a quick project over the summer to make a game alongside my students in PuzzleScript has led, eventually, to the completion of At the Mountains of Madness, a game based on the novella of the same name by H. P. Lovecraft.

So go ahead and give it a shot.  The whole game, or interactive graphical fiction-thing, whatever, should take a first-timer around ten to fifteen minutes to play through.

atmom


Math for Writers

So I just finished an intensive weekend workshop taught by Mary Robinette Kowal (and can’t quite believe that I’m back at the keyboard already).  I got a huge amount out of it, and I hope I can get back on my game enough to talk about it more here, but that’s for another time.  For the moment, I’ll just say, first, that if you get a chance to take one of Mary’s workshops, you really really should.  Your writing will thank you, and you’ll make some new friends.

Second, I wanted to share something that came out of the workshop that we talked about in detail, and which I then condensed into this handy (not a guarantee) formula.  If you want to know about how long a story you’re going to be writing, given an outline, just remember:

Ls=((C+L)*750)*M

In other words, the Length of your story (roughly) will be the number of Characters (C) and scenic Locations (L) times 750, further multiplied by the number of major elements of the M.I.C.E. Quotient (M) that you are focusing on.

This is, of course, a very rough calculation, based on the assumption that each Character or Location adds between 500 and 1000 words to your story, per major M.I.C.E. element focused on.  It shouldn’t be seen as some magical target goal that you must hit exactly and should never go under or over (especially since I’m using the middle-ground figure of 750 words, rather than either extreme).  Rather, it’s for planning.  If I want to put five characters and seven locations into a CE story, but I only wanted it to be 4K words, this would quickly tell me that I either have to adjust my goals or make some major cuts.


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